Comparing E

Compare Fractions with unlike numerators and unlike denominators using models and symbols

Fraction Learning Pathway

Curriculum Connections

COMP E Compare fractions with unlike numerators and unlike denominators using models and symbols
Grade Curriculum Expectations
1
  • divide whole objects into parts and identify and describe, through investigation, equal-sized parts of the whole, using fractional names (e.g., halves; fourths or quarters).
2
  • determine, through investigation using concrete materials, the relationship between the number of fractional parts of a whole and the size of the fractional parts (e.g., a paper plate divided into fourths has larger parts than a paper plate divided into eighths) (Sample problem: Use paper squares to show which is bigger, one half of a square or one fourth of a square.).
2
  • compare fractions using concrete materials, without using standard fractional notation (e.g., use fraction pieces to show that three fourths are bigger than one half, but smaller than one whole).
4
  • compare and order fractions (i.e., halves, thirds, fourths, fifths, tenths) by considering the size and the number of fractional parts (e.g., 45 is greater than 35 because there are more parts in 45; 14 is greater than 15 because the size of the part is larger in 14);
4
  • compare fractions to the benchmarks of 0, 12 and 1 ( e.g., 18 is closer to 0 than 12; 35 is more than 12);
4
  • determine and explain, through investigation, the relationship between fractions (i.e., halves, fifths, tenths) and decimals to tenths, using a variety of tools (e.g., concrete materials, drawings, calculators) and strategies (e.g., decompose 25 into 410 by dividing each fifth into two equal parts to show that 25 can be represented as 0.4)
5
  • represent, compare, and order fractional amounts with like denominators, including proper and improper fractions and mixed numbers, using a variety of tools (e.g., fraction circles, Cuisenaire rods, number lines) and using standard fractional notation;
5
  • determine and explain, through investigation using concrete materials, drawings, and calculators, the relationship between fractions (i.e., with denominators of 2, 4, 5, 10, 20, 25, 50, and 100) and their equivalent decimal forms (e.g., use a 10 x 10 grid to show that 25 = 40100, which can also be represented as 0.4).
6
  • represent, compare, and order fractional amounts with unlike denominators, including proper and improper fractions and mixed numbers, using a variety of tools and using standard fractional notation;
6
  • determine and explain, through investigation using concrete materials, drawings, and calculators, the relationships among fractions, decimal numbers, and percents.
7
  • use a variety of mental strategies to solve problems involving the addition and subtraction of fractions and decimals;
7
  • add and subtract fractions with simple like and unlike denominators, using a variety of tools and algorithms;
7
  • determine, through investigation, the relationships among fractions, decimals, percents, and ratios;
8
  • represent, compare, and order rational numbers;
8
  • translate between equivalent forms of a number;
8
  • use estimation when solving problems involving operations with whole numbers, decimals, percents, integers, and fractions, to help judge the reasonableness of a solution;
8
  • represent the multiplication and division of fractions, using a variety of tools and strategies;
8
  • solve problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division with simple fractions.
9D
  • simplify numerical expressions involving integers and rational numbers, with and without the use of technology;
9D
  • solve problems requiring the manipulation of expressions arising from applications of percent, ratio, rate, and proportion;
9D
  • identify, through investigation, properties of the slopes of lines and line segments (e.g., direction, positive or negative rate of change, steepness, parallelism, perpendicularity), using graphing technology to facilitate investigations, where appropriate
9P
  • represent, using equivalent ratios and proportions, directly proportional relationships arising from realistic situations (Sample problem: You are building a skateboard ramp whose ratio of height to base must be 2:3. Write a proportion that could be used to determine the base if the height is 4.5 m.);
9P
  • solve for the unknown value in a proportion, using a variety of methods (e.g., concrete materials, algebraic reasoning, equivalent ratios, constant of proportionality) (Sample problem: Solve x4 = 1520.);
9P
  • make comparisons using unit rates (e.g., if 500 mL of juice costs $2.29, the unit rate is 0.458¢/mL; this unit rate is less than for 750 mL of juice at $3.59, which has a unit rate of 0.479¢/mL);
9P
  • solve problems involving ratios, rates, and directly proportional relationships in various contexts (e.g., currency conversions, scale drawings, measurement), using a variety of methods (e.g., using algebraic reasoning, equivalent ratios, a constant of proportionality; using dynamic geometry software to construct and measure scale drawings)
9P
  • solve problems requiring the expression of percents, fractions, and decimals in their equivalent forms
9P
  • simplify numerical expressions involving integers and rational numbers, with and without the use of technology;*